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Axis Sally

Paperback (370 pages), kindle
Mildred Gillars, an American broadcaster employed by the Third Reich in Nazi Germany to proliferate propaganda during WWII, became the most notorious female of the 20th Century.

Axis Sally

Mildred Gillars was born at the beginning of the 20th Century. Her father, a cruel and abusive man, abandoned Mildred on her 7th birthday. The rejection left Mildred with an underlying distrust of male acceptance and love. Growing-up, she consciously cultivated a strong sense of independence and self-reliance.

Mildred's formal working life began during the carefree era in society dubbed “The Roaring 20s”, the economy was good and the population spent freely. The American Theater was at its peak and Mildred yearned to be the biggest star of the "Broadway Stage". Unfortunately, her best efforts only produced a few minor parts and a lot of rejection. Although, Mildred's resolve never faltered, the need to survive was a constant problem. She found some "B" movie work and even stared in one movie that crossed the lines of decency and landed her some jail time.

The indulgent days of the "Roaring 20s" slipped into the gloom of the "Great Depression" with the 1929 crash of Wall St. Seemingly overnight unemployment rose to over 25% and austerity set in across the land. Most of the stage theaters closed and those few that managed to stay open, hired only staring actors. Clearly, there was no room for Mildred's talent in America.

A friend's offer to go to accompany him on a voyage to Algiers came her way and Mildred, without hesitation, took it the offer. She did not return with her host. From Algiers, she made her way to Europe, then Paris, where Mildred's life took a major change never to recover. The next 15 years led her to situations and experiences beyond her wildest ambitions as she became the most notorious female of the 20th Century.

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